Why so perfect? — XDrive

It was not an ordinary intersect. Fell in love with your intellect. I was glad that I got that connect. Then I found out, what made you so perfect? It’s because you were just a silhouette. -Raj At the Silhouette

via Why so perfect? — XDrive


Modern Stories : A Little Friend


That was a bad day for our Mr. Lion King. During his chase to catch a rabbit he sprang into a small bush from where he came out not with the rabbit but with a large thorn in his palm.

He cried for help. He tried his best to pull out the thorn. He shook his hand, tried to pull out the thorn with his mouth etc. but all his efforts was in vain. The thorn began to smile at Mr. Lion.

Then he asked other animals for help. But they all feared the lion. So no animals came to help him.

At last the lion approached the clever fox. The king asked, “Can you pull out the thorn please. I am suffering very much with pain.”

The fox said, “I am not very expert in this task. But I have a little friend who is very expert in this work. I will surely ask him to help you. But I have some demands.”

“What are your demands?” asked the king.

“It is not just food or money Your Majesty! You should allow me to give you five kicks on your back!” the fox said.

The lion king asked with surprise and anger “Do you want to kick me? Don’t you know who I am?”

“I know! I know! But it is not my need to remove thorn from your palm. If you don’t want I am going. Good Bye” said the fox.

“Hey! Wait! Wait!” said the lion and he began to think for a moment “I am suffering with the pain of the thorn. It has to be pulled out. Let him kick me five times. I just want to remove the thorn. After taking the thorn I will eat up his little friend.”

The fox then began to kick the Lion King with his permission. One, two, three… like that. The fox called his little friend.

There comes a little porcupine. He pulled out the thorn with great ease. The pain in the palm of the lion was reduced. But his mind became filled with anger, grief and disappointment. What to say! He was very much disappointed in thinking how he can take revenge for the five kicks he got from the fox. How can he eat the porcupine with thousands of quills? At last he had to bow down before the great intelligence of the clever fox.

WPC: Variations on a Theme: Island Cottages, St. George Island

It would be hard to miss these island cottages on St. George Island. On either side of the lighthouse, they stand tall with their backs to the Gulf while winking at passers-by on Gulf Beach Drive. They may seem like tiny homes (all the rage now on HGTV), but actually, they’re quite large with most […]

via WPC: Variations on a Theme: Island Cottages, St. George Island — Oh, the Places We See . . .

How The Flower Ketaki Fell from Grace : Hindu Mythological Story


How The Flower Ketaki Fell from GraceOnce while Vishnu and Brahma were quarrelling about which of them was superior to the other, Shiva, in the form of a column of light, appeared beside them. The column seemed to have no beginning or end, stretching upwards and downwards as far as the eye could see. The two gods decided that whoever found the top or the bottom of the column first would be deemed to be superior to the other.
So they set out, Vishnu in the form of a boar, and Brahma in the form of a swan. Vishnu descended for aeons together, but could not find the base of the column, and finally gave up the search. Brahma, soaring upwards, was equally unsuccessful in reaching the top. He saw a ketaki flower wafting down, and catching it, returned to the starting point where Vishnu was waiting for him.

How The Flower Ketaki Fell from Grace Then followed a spot of duplicity. Brahma, claiming success, waved the flower, which he said he had found at the summit, in Vishnu’s face. Vishnu doubted his claim. He asked the ketaki if what Brahma said was true. The flower said it was.

The barefaced lie infuriated Shiva, and he cursed the flower (another version says the flower refused to substantiate Brahma’s claim and that it was Brahma who cursed it). The ketaki, till then considered the best among flowers, lost its importance and was never again offered in worship except on Mahashivratri when it makes a shy appearance.


Skip to toolbar